New Program — GUIDED WORK WITH HORSES FOR PERSONS WITH EARLY STAGE DEMENTIA AND THEIR CARE PARTNERS

The Connected Horse Project, a collaboration with the Stanford University Red Barn Leadership Program, explores how guided engagement with horses can help people living with dementia and their care partners maintain purpose and confidence as well as continued connection to their community.

We are looking for participants for our upcoming workshops — May 17, 24, 31 2016.

Workshop Scope and Criteria:

  • Participants: People 75 years of age and younger with a diagnosis of early stage dementia and their primary care partners (i.e. a family member or friend).
  • Methods: No prior experience with horses is necessary to participate in this study. Participants will not be riding horses; they will be engaging with horses from the ground.
  • Objective: To gain understanding of stressors and stress reducers for people living with early stage dementia and their primary care partners and to gain understanding on how to better support the care partner relationship.

Workshop Logistics:

  • Time involved: 1 hour for initial phone interview, 3 hours for barn tour and pre-workshop surveys, two 5-hour workshops with the horses, 1 hour for post program phone interview and surveys equaling 15 total hours within a 60-day period.
  • Location: Stanford Red Barn; 100 Electioneer Rd, Stanford, CA 94305.
  • When: May–June, 2016
  • Cost: There is no cost to participate in this program.

If you are interested in participating, please contact 650-498-5903.

Download workshop flyer

Learn more about the program and workshops.

NEW RESEARCH PROJECT THROUGH STANFORD UNIVERSITY

The Connected Horse Project launched a pilot research study in November 2015 under the guidance of Stanford University and Stanford University's Red Barn Equine Leadership Program. This groundbreaking pilot project was designed to enable people just beginning the journey of living with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias and their care partners (typically spouses, partners, adult children, friends, or relatives) to connect with horses in facilitated interactions. This program is the first of its kind to support people living with early stage dementia diagnoses and their care partners through equine-guided activities focusing on self awareness and verbal and nonverbal communication.

Learn more about this exciting research project.

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